Monday, April 10, 2017

Building GCC with support for NVIDIA PTX offloading

GCC can offload C, C++, and Fortran code to an accelerator when using OpenACC or OpenMP where the code to offload is controlled by adding #pragma statements (or magic comments for Fortran), such as
#pragma acc kernels
for (int j = 1; j < n-1; j++) {
  for (int i = 1; i < m-1; i++) {
    Anew[j][i] = 0.25f * (A[j][i+1] + A[j][i-1] + A[j-1][i] + A[j+1][i]);
    error = fmaxf(error, fabsf(Anew[j][i] - A[j][i]));
  }
}
This blog post describes what I needed to do in order to build a GCC trunk compiler with support for offloading to NVIDIA GPUs on Ubuntu 16.10.

The first step is to install the NVIDIA CUDA toolkit. Googling shows lots of strange suggestions about what you need to do in order to get this to work (blacklisting drivers, adding the PCI address of your video card to config files, etc.), but it worked fine for me to just download the “deb (local)” file, and install it as
sudo dpkg -i cuda-repo-ubuntu1604-8-0-local-ga2_8.0.61-1_amd64.deb
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install cuda
The toolkit is installed in /usr/local/cuda, and /usr/local/cuda/bin must be added to PATH so that GCC may find the ptxas tool.

The script below fetches the source code and builds the compiler and tools

Add $install_dir/lib64 to LD_LIBRARY_PATH, and the compiler can now be used to offload OpenACC code by compiling as
$install_dir/bin/gcc -O3 -fopenacc test.c
or OpenMP as
$install_dir/bin/gcc -O3 -fopenmp test.c
You may need to pass -foffload=-lm to the compiler if the code you offload contains math functions that cannot be directly generated as PTX instructions.

Saturday, March 25, 2017

pre-decrement vs. post-decrement, etc.

A recent talk at the OpenIoT Summit NA 2017, “Optimizing C for Microcontrollers — Best Practices”, had three examples illustrating the effect of different code constructs
  • Array subscript vs. pointer access
  • Loops (increment vs. decrement)
  • Loops (post-decrement vs. pre-decrement)
as compiled using GCC 6.x on ARM and the -Os optimization level. This blog post will look a bit closer at those examples, and discuss why the conclusions are not always valid.

Array subscript vs. pointer access

The first example is meant to illustrate the difference between array subscripts and pointer access with the two functions
int a[5];

int foo1(void)
{
    int i;
    int res = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        res += a[i];
    return res;
}
and
int a[5];

int foo2(void)
{
    int *p;
    int i;
    int res = 0;
    for (p = a, i = 0; i < 5; i++, p++)
        res += *p;
    return res;
}
The first function is generated in a natural way
foo1:
    movs  r0, #0
    mov   r3, r0
    ldr   r1, .L5
.L3:
    ldr   r2, [r1, r3, lsl #2]
    adds  r3, r3, #1
    cmp   r3, #5
    add   r0, r0, r2
    bne   .L3
    bx    lr
while the second function has its loop unrolled
foo2:
    ldr   r3, .L3
    ldm   r3, {r0, r2}
    add   r0, r0, r2
    ldr   r2, [r3, #8]
    add   r0, r0, r2
    ldr   r2, [r3, #12]
    ldr   r3, [r3, #16]
    add   r0, r0, r2
    add   r0, r0, r3
    bx    lr
The reason for this difference is that compiling with -Os should not unroll loops if unrolling increases the code size. But it is hard to estimate the resulting code size, as later optimization passes should be able to take advantage of the unrolling and be able to remove redundant code, so the compiler is using a rather imprecise heuristic. These loops are really close to the threshold (unrolling increases the code size by 4 bytes) and the minor difference between how the loops look when passed to the unroller makes the heuristic estimate that unrolling foo1 will increase the size by one instruction while foo2 will get the same size after unrolling.

This does, however, not illustrate any fundamental difference in the compiler’s understanding of array subscript compared pointer access — any difference in the code could affect a heuristic and have a similar effect (I have worked on compilers that generate different code if you rename variables or even add a comment!).1

Loops (increment vs. decrement)

The second example uses the two functions
void foo1(void)
{
    int x = 0;
    do {
        printk("X = %d\n", x);
        x++;
    } while (x < 100);
}
and
void foo2(void)
{
    int x = 100;
    do {
        printk("X = %d\n", x);
        x--;
    } while (x);
}
to illustrate that it is better to write loops decrementing the iteration variable, as the CPU can do the end of loop check for free as
subs  r4, r4, #1
bne   .L3 
instead of
adds  r4, r4, #1
cmp   r4, #100
bne   .L3
That is true, but the compiler can in many cases transform the loop to change iteration order, so the iteration order in the generated program depend more on what the loop does than how it iterates in the source code.

Note that the two functions do not do the same thing — foo1 outputs the numbers in increasing order and foo2 outputs them in decreasing order. Modifying foo2 to do the same thing as foo1, by changing the function call to
printk("X = %d\n", 100 - x);
makes it generate identical code as foo1 (as the compiler decides that it is better to iterate using increments in order to eliminate the subtraction) even though the function was written as using decrements.

Loops (post-decrement vs. pre-decrement)

The third example consider pre- vs. post-decrement using the examples
void foo1(void)
{
    unsigned int x = 10;
    do {
        if (--x) {
            printk("X = %d\n", x);
        } else {
            printk("X = %d\n", x);
            x = 10;
        }
    } while (1);
}
and
void foo2(void)
{
    unsigned int x = 9;
    do {
        if (x--) {
            printk("X = %d\n", x);
        } else {
            printk("X = %d\n", x);
            x = 9;
        }
    } while (1);
}
The example is meant to illustrate that --x is better, as it can get the comparison as a side effect of the subtraction in the same way as the previous example
subs  r4, r4, #1
bne   .L3 
but it depends much on the microarchitecture if this is beneficial or not. Many microarchitectures can do compare and branch efficiently,2 so a compare and a branch are not necessarily slower than branching on the status code from the subtraction. The problem with --x is that it adds a data dependency — you must do the subtraction before you can evaluate the if-statement. With x-- you can evaluate the if-statement and subtraction in parallel, with the result that
if (--x)
need one extra cycle to execute compared to
if (x--)
for superscalar CPUs having efficient compare and branch.


1. This typically happens when the compiler has different equivalent choices (for example, should it spill variable a or b to the stack), and it just chooses the first alternative. The first alternative is found by iterating over some kind of container, and this container may be an associative array using pointer values as the key...
2. For example, x86 CPUs tend to fuse cmp and jne so that they execute as one instruction.

Sunday, March 5, 2017

The cost of conditional moves and branches

The previous blog post contained an example where branching was much more expensive than using a conditional move, but it is easy to find cases where conditional moves reduce performance noticeably. One such case is in this stack overflow question (and GCC bug 56309) discussing the performance of a function implementing a naive bignum multiplication
static void inline
single_mult(const std::vector<ull>::iterator& data,
            const std::vector<ull>::const_iterator& rbegin,
            const std::vector<ull>::const_iterator& rend,
            const ull x)
{
    ull tmp=0, carry=0, i=0;
    for (auto rhs_it = rbegin; rhs_it != rend; ++rhs_it)
    {
        tmp = x * (*rhs_it) + data[i] + carry;
        if (tmp >= imax) {
            carry = tmp >> numbits;
            tmp &= imax - 1;
        } else { 
            carry = 0;
        }
        data[i++] = tmp;
    }
    data[i] += carry;
}

void
naive(std::vector<ull>::iterator data, 
      std::vector<ull>::const_iterator cbegin,
      std::vector<ull>::const_iterator cend,
      std::vector<ull>::const_iterator rbegin,
      std::vector<ull>::const_iterator rend)
{
    for (auto data_it = cbegin; data_it != cend; ++data_it)
    {
        if (*data_it != 0) {
            single_mult(data, rbegin, rend, *data_it);
        }
        ++data;
    }
}
Minor changes to the source code made the compiler use conditional moves instead of a branch, and this reduced the performance by 25%.

The difference between branches and conditional moves can be illustrated by
a = a + b;
if (c > 0)
    a = -a;
a = a + 1;
It is not possible to calculate the number of clock cycles for a code segment when working with reasonably complex CPUs, but it is often easy to get a good estimate (see e.g. this example for how to use such estimates when optimizing assembly code). The CPU converts the original instructions to micro-ops, and it can dispatch several micro-ops per cycle (e.g. 8 for Broadwell). The details are somewhat complicated,1 but most instructions in this blog post are translated to one micro-op that can be executed without any restrictions.

An assembly version using a branch looks like (assuming that the variables are placed in registers)
    addl    %edx, %eax
    testl   %ecx, %ecx
    jle     .L2
    negl    %eax
.L2:
    addl    $1, %eax
The CPU combines the testl and jle instructions to one micro-op by what is called “macro-fusion”, so both the addition and the test/branch instructions can be dispatched in the first cycle. It takes a while for the compare and branch to execute, but branch prediction means that the CPU can speculatively start executing the next instruction in the following cycle, so the final addl or the negl can be dispatched in the second cycle (depending on if the branch is predicted as taken or not). The result is that the code segment is done in 2 or 3 cycles, provided that the branch prediction was correct — a mispredict must discard the speculated instructions and restart execution, which typically adds 15–20 cycles.

Generating a version using a conditional move produces something like
    addl    %edx, %eax
    movl    %eax, %edx
    negl    %edx
    testl   %ecx, %ecx
    cmovg   %edx, %eax
    addl    $1, %eax
The first cycle will execute the first addition and the test instruction, and the following cycles will only be able to execute one instruction at a time as all of them depend on the previous instruction. The result is that this needs 5 cycles to execute.2

So the version with conditional moves takes twice the time to execute compared to the version using a branch, which is noticeable in the kind of short loops from single_mult. In addition, pipeline-restrictions on how instructions can be dispatched (such as only one division instruction can be dispatched each cycle) makes it hard for the CPU to schedule long dependency chains efficiently, which may be a problem for more complex code.


1. See “Intel 64 and IA-32 Architectures Optimization Reference Manual” and Agner Fog’s optimization manuals for the details.
2. This assumes that the cmovg instruction is one micro-op. That is true for some CPUs such as Broadwell, while others split it into two micro-ops.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Branch prediction

Branch misprediction is expensive: an example

The SciMark 2.0 Monte Carlo benchmark is calculating \(\pi\) by generating random points \(\{(x,y) \mid x,y \in [0,1]\}\) and calculating the ratio of points that are located within the quarter circle \(\sqrt{x^2 + y^2} \le 1\). The square root can be avoided by squaring both sides, and the benchmark is implemented as
double MonteCarlo_integrate(int Num_samples)
{
    Random R = new_Random_seed(SEED);
    int under_curve = 0;

    for (int count = 0; count < Num_samples; count++)
    {
        double x = Random_nextDouble(R);
        double y = Random_nextDouble(R);
        if (x*x + y*y <= 1.0)
            under_curve++;
    }

    Random_delete(R);
    return ((double) under_curve / Num_samples) * 4.0;
}
GCC used to generate a conditional move for this if-statement, but a recent change made this generate a normal branch which caused a 30% performance reduction for the benchmark due to the branch being mispredicted (bug 79389).

The randomization function is not inlined as it is compiled in a separate file, and it contains a non-trivial amount of loads, stores, and branches
typedef struct
{
    int m[17];
    int seed, i, j, haveRange;
    double left, right, width;
} Random_struct, *Random;

#define MDIG 32
#define ONE 1
static const int m1 = (ONE << (MDIG-2)) + ((ONE << (MDIG-2)) - ONE);
static const int m2 = ONE << MDIG/2;
static double dm1;

double Random_nextDouble(Random R) 
{
    int I = R->i;
    int J = R->j;
    int *m = R->m;

    int k = m[I] - m[J];
    if (k < 0)
        k += m1;
    R->m[J] = k;

    if (I == 0) 
        I = 16;
    else
        I--;
    R->i = I;

    if (J == 0) 
        J = 16;
    else
        J--;
    R->j = J;

    if (R->haveRange) 
        return  R->left +  dm1 * (double) k * R->width;
    else
        return dm1 * (double) k;
}
so I had expected the two calls to this function to dominate the running time, and that the cost of the branch would not affect the benchmark too much. But I should have known better — x86 CPUs can have more than 100 instructions in flight (192 micro-ops for Broadwell), and a mispredict need to throw away all that work and restart from the actual branch target.


Branch overhead and branch prediction

The cost of branch instructions differ between different CPU implementations, and the compiler needs to take that into account when optimizing and generating branches.

Simple processors with a 3-stage pipeline fetch the next instruction when previous two instructions are decoded and executed, but branches introduce a problem: the next instruction cannot be fetched before the address is calculated by executing the branch instruction. This makes branches expensive as they introduce bubbles in the pipeline. The cost can be reduced for conditional branches by speculatively fetching and decoding the instructions after the branch — this improves performance if the branch was not taken, but taken branches need to discard the speculated work, and restart from the actual branch target.

Some CPUs have instructions that can execute conditionally depending on a condition, and this can be used to avoid branches. For example
if (c)
    a += 3;
else
    b -= 2;
can be compiled to the following straight line code on ARM (assuming that a, b, and c are placed in r1, r2, and r0 respectively)
cmp     r0, #0
addne   r1, r1, #3
subeq   r2, r2, #2
The cmp instruction sets the Z flag in the status register, and the addne instruction is treated as an addition if Z is 0, and as a nop instruction if Z is 1. subeq is similarly treated as a subtraction if Z is 1 and as a nop if Z is 0. The instruction takes time to execute, even when treated as a nop, but this is still much faster than executing branches.

This means that the compiler should structure the generated code so that branches are minimized (using conditional execution when possible), and conditional branches should be generated so that the most common case is not taking the branch.

Taken branches become more expensive as the CPUs get deeper pipelines, and this is especially annoying as loops must branch to the top of the loop for each iteration. This can be solved by adding more hardware to let the fetch unit calculate the target address of the conditional branch, and the taken branch can now be the cheap case.

It is, however, nice to have the “not taken” case be the cheap case, as the alternative often introduce contrived control flow that fragments the instruction cache and need to insert extra “useless” (and expensive) unconditional branches. The way most CPUs solve this is to predict that forward branches are unlikely (and thus speculatively fetch from following instructions), and that backward branches are likely (and thus speculatively fetch from the branch target).

The compiler should do similar work as for the simpler CPU, but structure the code so that conditional branches branching forward are not taken in the common case, and conditional branches branching backward are taken in the common case.

There are many branches that the compiler cannot predict, so the next step up in complexity is adding branch prediction to the CPU. The basic idea is that the CPU keeps a cache of previous branch decisions and use this to predict the current branch. High-end branch predictors look at the history of code flow, and can correctly predict repetitive patterns in how the branch behaved. Hardware vendors do not publish detailed information about how the prediction work, but Agner Fog’s optimization manuals contain lots of information (especially part 3, “The microarchitecture of Intel, AMD and VIA CPUs”, that also have a good overview of different ways branch prediction can be done).

Branch prediction in high-end CPUs is really good, so branches are essentially free, while conditional execution adds extra dependencies between instructions which constrain the out-of-order execution engine, so conditional execution should be avoided. This is essentially the opposite from how the simple CPUs should be handled. 😃

There is one exception — branches that cannot be predicted (such as the one in SciMark) should be generated using conditional instructions, as the branch will incur the misprediction cost of restarting the pipeline each time it is mispredicted.

The compiler should not use conditional execution unless the condition is unpredictable. The code should be structured as for the static prediction (this is not strictly necessary, but most CPUs use the static prediction first time a branch is encountered. And it is also slightly more efficient for the instruction cache).

So branches are free, except when they cannot be predicted. I find it amusing that many algorithms (balanced search trees, etc.) have the aim to make the branches as random as possible. I do not know how much this is a problem in reality, but Clang has a built-in function, __builtin_unpredictable, that can be used to tell the compiler that the condition is unpredictable.


Heuristics for estimating branch probabilities

The compiler estimates branch probabilities in order to generate the efficient form of the branch (there are more optimizations that need to know if a code segment is likely executed or not, such as inlining and loop unrolling). The general idea, as described in the PLDI ’93 paper “Branch Prediction for Free”, is to look at how the branches are used. For example, code such as
if (p == NULL)
    return -1;
comparing a pointer with NULL and returning a constant, is most likely error handling, and thus unlikely to execute the return statement.

GCC has a number of such predictors, for example
  • Branch ending with returning a constant is probably not taken.
  • Branch from comparison using != is probably taken, == is probably not taken.
  • Branch to a basic block calling a cold function is probably not taken.
Each predictor provides a probability (that has been set from branch frequencies observed by instrumenting real world code), and these probabilities are combined for a final result. This is one reason why __builtin_expect often does not make any difference — the heuristics are already coming to the same conclusion!

The predictors are defined in predict.def (some of the definitions seem reversed due to how the rules are implemented, e.g. PROB_VERY_LIKELY may mean “very unlikely”, but the comments describing each heuristic are correct). You can see how GCC is estimating the branch probabilities by passing -fdump-tree-profile_estimate to the compiler, which writes a file containing the output from the predictors for each basic block
Predictions for bb 2
  DS theory heuristics: 1.7%
  combined heuristics: 1.7%
  pointer (on trees) heuristics of edge 2->4: 30.0%
  call heuristics of edge 2->3: 33.0%
  negative return heuristics of edge 2->4: 2.0%
as well as (when using GCC 7.x) the IR annotated with the estimated probabilities.

Sunday, January 8, 2017

GCC code generation for C++ Weekly Ep 43 example

Episode 43 of “C++ Weekly” talks about evaluating and eliminating code at compile time, and the example is fun as it triggers a few different deficiencies in the GCC optimization passes (using the -O3 optimization level with GCC trunk r243987 built for x86_64-linux-gnu).

The example
#include <type_traits>
#include <numeric>
#include <iterator>

template<typename ... T>
int sum(T ... t)
{
  std::common_type_t<T...> array[sizeof...(T)]{ t... };

  return std::accumulate(std::begin(array), std::end(array), 0);
}

int main()
{
  return sum(5,4,3,2,1);
}
is meant to be optimized to return a constant value, and it does
main:
    movl    $15, %eax
    ret
But the behavior varies a lot depending on how many arguments are passed to sum1–5 arguments work as expected, while calling sum with 6 or 7 arguments is generated as
main:
 movdqa .LC0(%rip), %xmm0
 movaps %xmm0, -40(%rsp)
 movl -32(%rsp), %edx
 movl -28(%rsp), %eax
 leal 14(%rdx,%rax), %eax
 ret
where .LC0 is an array consisting of four constants. 9–12 arguments are similar (but with more code). 

13–28 arguments are generated as a constant again
main:
    movl    $91, %eax
    ret

29–64 arguments are optimized to a constant, but with some redundant stack adjustments when the number of arguments is not divisible by four
main:
    subq    $16, %rsp
    movl    $435, %eax
    addq    $16, %rsp
    ret

Finally, 65 and more arguments are generated as a vectorized monstrosity in a separate function, called from main by pushing all the arguments to the stack, one at a time
main:
    subq    $16, %rsp
    movl    $60, %r9d
    movl    $61, %r8d
    pushq   $1
    pushq   $2
    movl    $62, %ecx
    pushq   $3
    ushq    $4
    ...
This is essentially as far from generating a constant as you can come. 😀

The rest of the blog post will look at how GCC is reasoning when trying to optimize this, by examining GCC's internal representation of the program at different points in the optimization pipeline. The IR works essentially as a restricted version of the C language, and you can get GCC to write the IR to a file after each pass by using the command-line option -fdump-tree-all.

1–5 arguments

The use of std::accumulate and iterators expand to five functions, and the compiler starts by inlining and simplifying this to
int main() ()
{
  common_type_t array[5];
  int __init;
  int * __first;
  int _3;

  <bb 2> [16.67%]:
  array[0] = 5;
  array[1] = 4;
  array[2] = 3;
  array[3] = 2;
  array[4] = 1;

  <bb 3> [100.00%]:
  # __first_2 = PHI <&array(2), __first_6(4)>
  # __init_4 = PHI <0 __init_5>
  if (&MEM[(void *)&array + 20B] == __first_2)
    goto <bb 5>; [16.67%]
  else
    goto <bb 4>; [83.33%]

  <bb 4> [83.33%]:
  _3 = *__first_2;
  __init_5 = _3 + __init_4;
  __first_6 = __first_2 + 4;
  goto <bb 3>; [100.00%]

  <bb 5> [16.67%]:
  array ={v} {CLOBBER};
  return __init_4;
}
The loop is immediately unrolled and simplified to
int main() ()
{
  common_type_t array[5];
  int __init;
  int * __first;
  int _15;
  int _20;
  int _25;
  int _30;
  int _35;

  <bb 2> [16.70%]:
  array[0] = 5;
  array[1] = 4;
  array[2] = 3;
  array[3] = 2;
  array[4] = 1;
  _15 = MEM[(int *)&array];
  __init_16 = _15;
  _20 = MEM[(int *)&array + 4B];
  __init_21 = _15 + _20;
  _25 = MEM[(int *)&array + 8B];
  __init_26 = __init_21 + _25;
  _30 = MEM[(int *)&array + 12B];
  __init_31 = __init_26 + _30;
  _35 = MEM[(int *)&array + 16B];
  __init_36 = __init_31 + _35;
  array ={v} {CLOBBER};
  return __init_36;
}
that is then optimized to a constant by the fre3 (“Full Redundancy Elimination”) pass
int main() ()
{
  <bb 2> [16.70%]:
  return 15;
}

6–12 arguments

The early optimizations that handled the previous case are there mostly to get rid of noise before the heavier optimizations (such as loop optimizations) kicks in, and the loop doing 6 iterations is considered too big to be unrolled by the early unroller.

The “real” loop optimizers determine that the loop is not iterating enough for vectorization to be profitable, so it is just unrolled. The “SLP vectorizer” that vectorizes straight line code is run right after the loop optimizations, and it sees that we are copying constants into consecutive addresses, so it combines four of them to a vector assignment
MEM[(int *)&array] = { 6, 5, 4, 3 };
array[4] = 2;
array[5] = 1;
This is now simplified by the dom3 pass that does SSA dominator optimizations (jump threading, redundancy elimination, and const/copy propagation), but it does not understand that a scalar initialized by a constant vector is a constant, so it only propagates the constants for array[4] and array[5] that were initialized as scalars, and the code passed to the backend looks like
int main() ()
{
  common_type_t array[6];
  int __init;
  int _15;
  int _22;
  int _27;
  int _32;

  <bb 2> [14.31%]:
  MEM[(int *)&array] = { 6, 5, 4, 3 };
  _15 = MEM[(int *)&array];
  _22 = MEM[(int *)&array + 4B];
  __init_23 = _15 + _22;
  _27 = MEM[(int *)&array + 8B];
  __init_28 = __init_23 + _27;
  _32 = MEM[(int *)&array + 12B];
  __init_33 = __init_28 + _32;
  __init_43 = __init_33 + 3;
  array ={v} {CLOBBER};
  return __init_43;
}

13–28 arguments

The loop is now iterated enough times that the compiler determines that vectorization is profitable. The idea behind the vectorization is to end up with something like
tmp = { array[0], array[1], array[2], array[3] }
    + { array[4], array[5], array[6], array[7] }
    + { array[8], array[9], array[10], array[11] };
sum = tmp[0] + tmp[1] + tmp[2] + tmp[3] + array[12];
and the vectorizer generates two loops — one that consumes four elements at a time as long as possible, and one that consumes the remaining elements one at a time. The rest of the loop optimizers know how many times the loops are iterating, so the loops can then be unrolled etc. as appropriate.

The vectorizer is, unfortunately, generating somewhat strange code for the checks that there are enough elements
_35 = (unsigned long) &MEM[(void *)&array + 52B];
_36 = &array + 4;
_37 = (unsigned long) _36;
_38 = _35 - _37;
_39 = _38 /[ex] 4;
_40 = _39 & 4611686018427387903;
if (_40 <= 4)
  goto ; [10.00%]
else
  goto ; [90.00%]
that confuse the rest of the loop optimizations, with the result that the IR contains lots of conditional code of this form. This is not the first time I have seen GCC having problems with the pointer arithmetics from iterators (see bug 78847), and I believe this is the same problem (as the bitwise and should be optimized away when the pointer arithmetics has been evaluated to a constant).

The subsequent passes mostly manage to clean up these conditionals, and dom3 optimizes the vector operations to a constant. But it does not understand the expression used to decide how many scalar elements need to be handled if the iteration count is not a multiple of four (that check is eliminated by the value range propagation pass after dom3 is run), so the scalar additions are kept in the code given to the backend
int main() ()
{
  common_type_t array[13];
  int __init;
  int _23;

   [7.14%]:
  array[12] = 1;
  _23 = MEM[(int *)&array + 48B];
  __init_3 = _23 + 90;
  array ={v} {CLOBBER};
  return __init_3;
}
This is, however, not much of a problem for this program, as the backend manages to optimize this to
main:
    movl    $91, %eax
    ret
when generating the code.

2964 arguments

The backend eliminates the memory accesses to the array in the previous case, but the array seems to be kept on the stack. That makes sense — the code is supposed to be optimized before being passed to the backend, so the backend should not be able to eliminate variables, and there is no need to implement code doing this.

Leaf functions do not need to adjust the stack, but GCC does some stack adjustment on leaf functions too when more than 112 bytes are placed on the stack. You can see this for the meaningless function
void foo()
{
    volatile char a[113];
    a[0] = 0;
}
where the stack is adjusted when the array size is larger than 112.
foo:
    subq    $16, %rsp
    movb    $0, -120(%rsp)
    addq    $16, %rsp
    ret
I do not understand what GCC is trying to do here...

Anyway, passing 29 arguments to sum makes the array large enough that GCC adds the stack adjustments.

65– arguments

The sequence of assignments initializing the array is now large enough that sum is not inlined into main.